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saving The West

A whole systems approach

 

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saving The West

A whole systems approach

 

 The west covers 11 states, the west is a physical presence of 1.3 million square miles, the west is home for 72 million people, and within its terrain is 1.3 million of now fire endangered acres of forest

 

 

The team and its intentions

The Saving the West team was organized in 2016 by the Center for the Force Majeure to promote a whole systems approach to the challenges of fire and drought in the Sierra Nevada and ultimately across the intermountain west. We have become a collaborative group bringing a range of individuals, organizations, artists, scientists, policy makers and community groups committed to building enduring environmentally informed end-to-end solutions. We believe success is available only when we can inspire we can inspire the development a 21st century forestry model.

We support the development of a renewable wood products economy, creating a sustainable economic engine for thousands of people in historically depressed areas. The beneficial effects of a renewable wood based economy transcend traditional economic virtues. In a virtuous cycle, good environmental stewardship becomes good economic development. Wildlife, water quality, quality of work and life all improve.

Not reaching crown fire status, the ground fire becomes self-cancelling after thinning work at the UC Berkeley Sagehen Creek Field Station, 2016

Not reaching crown fire status, the ground fire becomes self-cancelling after thinning work at the UC Berkeley Sagehen Creek Field Station, 2016


Saving the West is a project of the Center for the Study of the Force Majeure a non profit associated with the Arts Division at University of California Santa Cruz

The Center for the Study of the Force Majeure brings together artists, scientists, engineers and planners and visionaries to design mitigation systems and policies that respond to the issues raised by global temperature rise at the scale that they present.

We focus on identifying and developing what we call Whole Systems approaches that merge environmental, social and economic patterns of organization. These in turn generate comprehensive complex systems where human stewardship is at the service environmental stewardship.

www.centerforforcemajeure.org